Embodied Carbon – Why it Matters to the Structural Engineer

There is a lot of buzz happening in the structural engineering community around reducing carbon. Engineers are being asked from clients what they are doing to reduce embodied carbon in their structural designs. However, many structural engineers are not clear what their role is to play in reducing carbon. If they deliver a “good” structural design that is efficient and well-coordinated, won’t that do its best at reducing carbon? This article by Michael Gustafson responds to this question and elaborates on the topic of embodied carbon as it relates to structural engineering in more detail. 

URL: https://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2022/issue_105.html

Five Powerful Lessons Shaping the Future of AEC

The past few years have been challenging for the AEC industry, as architecture firm owners worked to maintain business continuity amidst an unfolding pandemic and economic disruptions while simultaneously addressing an escalating client demand for more sustainable, ethical design. The demands have called upon architects and designers to find new ways of working and to deliver results that will benefit their clients and the communities served by their projects well into the future.

Throughout external disruptions beyond its control, the AEC industry has learned important lessons that are helping to redefine the industry and shape future work. In this article, Roderick Bates, Head of Integrated Practice at Enscape, highlights five of the most powerful of these lessons.

URL: https://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2022/issue_104.html

How Point Cloud Meshing Software Benefits the AEC Industry

As reality capture technologies have advanced in AEC, users have been able to generate increasingly detailed and accurate surveys, each image formed from millions of data points. However, this depth of information also raises some information challenges, particularly if site-based personnel want to access and interact with the data. In this Viewpoint article, Steve Salmon of Pointfuse discusses the importance of intelligent meshing technology in a much more efficient representation of point clouds, benefiting the construction as well as subsequent operation and maintenance (O&M) of buildings and infrastructure.

URL: https://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2022/issue_103.html

BIM: Opening New Avenues

Building Information Modeling or BIM is no longer a new concept. Every now and then, it gets integrated with a new technology, further strengthening its role in unifying different aspects of the construction process and subsequently, the management of the asset created. Some of the technologies that BIM has been successfully integrated with are GIS, IoT, AR/VR, Artificial Intelligence, and 3D printing. This Viewpoint article by Soumya Das, the founder and CEO of Aarka Technology Pvt Ltd, discusses how these integrations can open up new avenues for BIM in the future.

URL: https://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2021/issue_101.html

Social Distance Modelling for COVID

On 15 August 2020, the Danish Heath Authority issued regulations, that among other things, required enforcement of physical distancing, both onboard trains and in public facilities. This article describes the research that was conducted by a team at the Technical University of Denmark to study the impact of COVID-19 on the passenger flow in the Copenhagen Metro, using passenger flow data and station floorplan drawings as well as Bentley Legion software for simulation of pedestrian flow.

URL: https://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2021/issue_100.html

The BIM Revolution – What to Expect in 2021 and Beyond

Over the past year, many industries have experienced unprecedented disruption due to the new challenges and uncertainties brought on by the pandemic. In construction, this has meant ongoing projects being paused, new project start dates being delayed, and stalled progress around the digital-driven evolution of some construction practices.

In this article, Frank Weiss, Senior Director, New Products, BIM and Innovation at Oracle Construction and Engineering discusses how the landscape of building information modelling (BIM) will evolve in 2021 and beyond and the four key areas the construction industry needs to address for a successful transition: the common data environment (CDE); data relevance and quality; the adoption of digital twins; and improvements to more industry standardization and openness.

URL: https://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2021/issue_99.html

Game change 2021: How Service, Offsite, and New Technology Will Change Construction

With the number of construction projects dwindling as a result of the pandemic, many companies are reimagining their business models to secure their future. While how to increase productivity remains one of the major hurdles that the industry needs to overcome, construction and engineering companies must also look to servitization — the idea that construction organizations compete on full lifecycle support offerings rather than simply the tasks associated with initial build — to attract new business.

In this article, Kenny Ingram, Vice President of Engineering, Construction & Infrastructure at IFS summarizes some key trends that he believes will color 2021 and beyond, including lifecycle management, offsite construction, and 5D BIM.

URL: http://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2021/issue_97.html

Managing BIM Technology in the Building Industry

On November 11, 2020, the AEC Technology industry lost one of its leading figures, Chuck Eastman. In memoriam, AECbytes is reprinting this Viewpoint article from 2008 that was authored by Chuck Eastman and his co-authors of their seminal work, the “BIM Handbook.”

Chuck Eastman was a Professor in the Colleges of Architecture and Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, and Director of the College of Architecture PhD Program where he led research in the area of Building Product Models and IT in building construction. His career was spent making building models a practical reality, starting in the 1970s. He held positions at UCLA and Carnegie-Mellon University, and was funded to advise industry associations on their development and deployment of BIM, including AISC, PCSC, NIBS and FIATECH. He authored 5 books and over 70 journal papers.

URL: http://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2020/issue_96.html